Lesson 2: Four Phase Lesson Design

1. What do you know about lesson design?

  • Open ended questions
  • Wait time
  • Multiple answers
  • Respectful responses 
  • Personalize learning
  • Analyze learning
  • Apply learning
  • Think-pair-share
  • Round robin

2. Brainstorming

3. Signaling

4. Sampling

What? So What? Now What?

  • What? (Description)
    • What did we do?
  • So What? (Analysis)
    • What did you learn? 
    • What were you thinking? 
    • What were you feeling?
  • Now What? (Application)
    • How will you apply these new skills and learnings in other aspects of your life?

The Four Stage Lesson Plan

  • Stage One: Discovering     

Finding out what they already know about the subject

  • Stage Two: Connecting  

  Presenting new information or skills

  • Stage Three:  Practice 

Practicing the new skill or information

  • Stage Four: Applying 

Taking the new skill or information beyond the classroom

Four Stage Lesson Plan Example:
Giving Feedback

Stage One: Discovery

Find out what participants already know about the subject

  • What do the trainees already know about this topic? 
  • How will I find out? 
  • What kinds of questions can I ask that will give me the information I need?
  • What kinds of activities can I use to find out the information? 

My Plan:

  1. Define “feedback”
    • Ask participants what they think feedback is. Gather a few answers, then present the definition we will go by in this workshop:
    • Feedback is helpful information or constructive criticism that is given to someone to help them identify what can be done to improve performance or behavior.
  2. Remind participants what it is like to receive feedback.
    • Ask participants to remember a time when they have been given feedback. Ask what was helpful and what was not.  Why did they gain from it? Explain that giving and receiving feedback is helpful, in fact essential to learning, however it involves very high risk on the part of the giver as well as the receiver. 
    • Let participants know that we all grow from feedback if it is given in the right way.  Later, most people will say they appreciated the feedback if it was constructively given.  Giving feedback is a way to show we care about someone else’s growth. 
    • Remind them that while feedback is useful it can also be uncomfortable.  In order to receive feedback in a useful way the person receiving the feedback needs to be able to hear it. 
    • Ask participants to think back to that time they received feedback.  Ask them to think about whether or not they used some of these techniques to make the feedback more helpful. 
      • What were they feeling at the time?
      • How did they feel after letting some time go by?

Stage Two: Connect

Present new information or skills

  • What is the new information or skill I want to present?
  • How will I present it?
  • What are my step-by-step procedures for presenting this information?
  • How will I know they are understanding the new skill or concept?

My Plan:

  1. Introduce the feedback model.
    • Show the formula on PowerPoint 21.
    • State the behavior in clear and specific terms.
    • State the effect it had on the person, the group, or the project.
    • State an alternative.
    • Pause (wait time)
  2. Read it through and then provide several examples like this:

When you didn’t put all the materials back in the designated boxes others could not find them. 

This created a safety and a time problem. 

Please put the things back in their proper bins before you leave.

  • Ask a few people to try some in front of the group.  When you think the concept is understood walk them through the Tips for Giving Feedback Sheet.
  • Model this two-part activity with a volunteer.  You go first as the person giving the feedback, then allow them to give feedback to you.  When you are receiving feedback remember to use the wait time and model that you are thinking about what was said.  Ask the participants to identify the parts of the feedback model as they heard it. 

Stage Three: Practice

Put into practice the new skill or information

  • How will I provide trainees with an opportunity to practice the new skill or information?
  • What activities will I use that help the trainees get a hands-on feel for the new skill?  What are my step-by-step   procedures for this activity?
  • How will I know they are understanding and able to do the new skill? 
  • When might I intervene? 
  • How will I reinforce the trainees for doing well? 

My Plan:

  1. Guide them through a practice.
  2. Ask participants to form groups of two.  Facilitator’s choice of how you pair them up.  When they are all seated explain that they will all have a slip of paper that has a situation from a real classroom.  The pair is to read the slip together and then one person should try to give the feedback using the model displayed on PowerPoint 21. 
  3. When the person is done, the pair should discuss what was said to determine if all the parts of the feedback model were given.  The person receiving the feedback should check to see how they were feeling as the feedback was given.  After one person has given the feedback, they are to change roles and repeat the process.

Ask for a few volunteer teams to role-play in front of the group.  Check to see if all parts of the Feedback Model were stated and that appropriate wait time was given.

Stage Four:  Application

Take the new skill or information beyond the classroom

  • How does this activity relate to the work environment the trainees will be working in?
  • What do I want them to do to practice these new skills after class? 
  • What, if any, homework will I give them? 
  • Did we cover everything they need to be successful in this activity?
  • What follow up and review questions or activities will I use tomorrow?
  • How will this new skill build into the next parts of their study?

My Plan: 

Lead a discussion about feedback using the following questions:

  • In what ways do you think this method was helpful in giving and receiving feedback?
  • How do you think your youth will react to this?
  • How do you think you will feel giving feedback this way?  Receiving feedback this way? 
  • Where else could you use this feedback model?

2 . Reflection

This part of the lesson plan allows the instructor a space to reflect on the lesson each time it is taught.  It allows an opportunity to fix what did not go well, anticipate trainees’ responses, and plan for an improved lesson for next time.  This should not be filled in until the whole lesson has been delivered and the instructor has had time to think about the lesson.

  • How did it go? 
  • What will I do differently next time I work with these trainees?
  • What will I add, delete, or change the next time I teach this skill?
  • What were some things I did well?

LESSON PLAN FORMAT

My plan for teaching about: __________________________________

Objectives

  • What do I want to accomplish by doing this lesson?

By the end of this class, the trainees will be able to: 

Materials

  • What do I need to have to make this lesson work?

Time

  • How much total time do I think it will take to complete this lesson? 
  • Can I do this lesson in one session or will I have to break it up into two or more lessons?
  • What points will I make during instructor talk time? 
  • When will I allow for trainees to ask questions?
  • How much time will trainees need to practice sufficiently?

Stage One: Discovery

  • What do the trainees already know about this topic? 
  • How will I find out?
  • What kinds of questions can I ask that will give me the information I need? 
  • What kinds of activities can I use to find out the information?

Stage Two:  Connecting – Presenting New Information or Skills

  • What is the new information or skill I want to present? 
  • How will I present it?
  • What are my step-by-step procedures for presenting this information?
  • How will I know trainees understand the new skill or idea?

Stage Three:  Practicing – Practicing the new skill or information

  • How will I provide trainees with an opportunity to practice the new skill or information?
  • What activities will I use that help the trainees get a hands-on feel for the new skill?  What are my step-by-step procedures for this activity?
  • How will I know they are understanding and able to do the new skill? 
  • When might I intervene? 
  • How will I reinforce the trainees for doing well? 

Stage Four:  Applying – Taking the new skill or information beyond the classroom

  • How does this activity relate to the work environment the trainees will be working in?
  • What do I want them to do to practice these new skills? 
  • What, if any, homework will I give them? 
  • Did we cover everything they need to be successful in this activity?
  • What follow up and review questions or activities will I use?
  • How will this new skill build into the next parts of their study?  

Reflection

NOTE: This should not be filled in until you have delivered the whole lesson and have had time to think about the lesson.

  • How did it go? 
  • What will I do differently next time I work with these young people?
  • What will I add, delete or change the next time I teach this skill?
  • What were some things I did well?